The Purpose and Intent of California Child Support Laws

Child Support Laws

If you are going through a divorce learning what the state of California says about child support can be a very important topic for you. Family Code 4053 lays out the purpose and intent of child support laws in California. The following are the key aspects of the California Family Code laws:

  • A mother and father’s first and most important obligation is to support their child.
  • Both parents are mutually responsible for the support of their children.
  • The guidelines take into account each parent’s actual income and level of responsibility for the children.
  • Each parent should pay for the support of the children according to his or her ability.
  • The interests of the children are the states top priority.
  • Children should share in the standard of living of both parents.
  • Child support may therefore appropriately improve the standard of living of the custodial household to improve the lives of the children. Meaning that child support also reduces the disparity of each parent’s standard of living.
  • Since California is an expensive State to live in child support orders reflect that.
  • California law presumes that the parent who has primary parent time already contributed a great deal of his or her resources to the child. But, this presumption can be rebutted.
  • California’s child support guidelines are designed to reduce conflict and lessen litigation.

What this all means is that in the state of California the child’s best interest is California’s number one priority. We understand the sincere importance of hiring an attorney you trust. We at the law office of Cary Goldstein, Esq., PC are dedicated to fighting for your rights. We are here to help you!

Contact the firm at (310) 935-0711 to discuss your child support issues with a skilled professional.

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